Opinions

Perspectives changed by a year of reflection

Second-year broadcast television student Madison Colbow reflects on her two years at SAIT in the Aldred Centre on Wednesday, March 29. Colbow came to Calgary from Estevan, Sask., to play for the Trojans women's hockey team. Her favourite memories here are those spent at the SAIT Arena and all of the friends she made along the way. Colbow plans to attend the University of Saskatchewan next fall where she will take courses toward a Bachelor of Arts. Photo by Madison Casavant /SAIT)

Second-year broadcast television student Madison Colbow reflects on her two years at SAIT in the Aldred Centre on Wednesday, March 29. Colbow came to Calgary from Estevan, Sask., to play for the Trojans women’s hockey team. Her favourite memories here are those spent at the SAIT Arena and all of the friends she made along the way. Colbow plans to attend the University of Saskatchewan next fall where she will take courses toward a Bachelor of Arts. Photo by Madison Casavant /SAIT)

As the end of the school year fast approaches, I find myself thinking about how I got here and why I’m so glad I stayed.

Before coming to SAIT, I spent five years at the University of Calgary studying political science, followed by two years of figuring out what the heck I was going to do with my life.

While my boyfriend, now fiancé, excelled in his career as an engineer, I felt more and more like a housewife.

One thing that has stuck with me through my studies has been how backwards so much of the world is, and how helpless one can feel when their generation is next in line to fix it.

My solution to the world’s problems was to write. My audience was only going to read my stories if they cared about the subject and hopefully, my words would teach and motivate them enough to change the things I wish I could.

Hello, journalism class of 2018.

I attended orientation and immediately thought I’d made a big mistake. Everyone there seemed to be straight out of high school, naïve, immature, and an alarmingly high number of them had pink hair.

I couldn’t help but roll my eyes. Ugh, kids. At 26 years-old I didn’t have the patience for this.

So, I tossed my free-food ticket in the trash and headed home. I mean, for God’s sake, we spent a good chunk of the orientation having a scavenger hunt.

The first week of school wasn’t much better. Our instructors spent their time forcing us into getting to know each other’s groups and cutesy little games.

I didn’t realize I’d registered for kindergarten. Within a few days I knew everyone’s life story and the reasons why they chose the journalism program.

Within a couple weeks though not only had I come to love my instructors and their genuine concern for us to do well, I had also learned a lot from my fresh-faced affiliates.

Besides the endless Internet memes, “dabbing,” and what is or isn’t, “lit,” there were also wonderful life lessons I never thought I’d learn from those with seemingly so much less life experience than me.

I learned to balance work and play. Never could I imagine forming such fruitful friendships with my classmates.

I went back to school with a job to do, and felt that I had outgrown the stereotypical college lifestyle, but being surrounded with those eager to enjoy these years both educationally and socially has taught me to have fun too.

I also find myself more enthusiastic than I was in my first go around with college, especially with those around me excited to be here as well.

Not only do I enjoy the subject matter that I’m learning, but being surrounded by people who haven’t had their hopes and dreams crushed yet is refreshing. I’m excited for me, and for them.

I actually want to be here, and I’d recommend anyone of any age considering going back to school to go for it, even if the majority of your peers were two-years-old when Brad and Jen got hitched.

Previous post

The movie versus the book

Next post

SAIT’s culture is success