Lifestyle

Let them eat cake

You can have your cake and eat it too

SAIT hots its centennial celebration event on campus on Sunday, Oct. 16, 2016. (Photo by Nikolai Cuthill/SAIT)

SAIT hosts its centennial celebration event on campus on Sunday, Oct. 16, 2016. (Photo by Nikolai Cuthill/SAIT)

SAIT’s centennial arrived on Oct. 16, 2016 and so did its centennial cake.

“Big, beautiful, spectacular, and just a collaboration of ideas,” said Amethyst Thompson, a second-year baking and pastry arts student describing the vision behind the biggest edible cake SAIT’s baking and pastry arts team has ever made.

Just how tall was the cake? Seven feet and a total of 13 tiers, baked with only the finest ingredients.

The cake was designed to be “massive,” said Thompson.

It consisted of chocolate and vanilla flavours, a Swiss meringue butter cream and was covered in colourful fondant with figurines of the SAIT family including students, instructors and other community members.

Excluding Chef Rose Warden, Thompson calculated that approximately 1030 man-hours went into baking the cake by volunteers consisting of students, alumni and others.

“This project took many people for this to come together and that is how I see SAIT as well. SAIT is about the people. It is the people who make SAIT what it is, and that is the same thing with this cake,” gushed Chef Rose Warden, the project manager.

“[The cake is] about the collaboration of people.”

SAIT hots its centennial celebration event on campus on Sunday, Oct. 16, 2016. (Photo by Nikolai Cuthill/SAIT)

SAIT hosts its centennial celebration event on campus on Sunday, Oct. 16, 2016. (Photo by Nikolai Cuthill/SAIT)

The centennial team worked day and night to accomplish their goal of baking the best cake SAIT has ever baked, and making sure the thousands of people in attendance were in awe when they got their taste.

Baking went from the last week of September until Friday, Oct. 7. The final touches were being added with a little more then a week until the celebration.

“We want it to be everybody’s cake. We want everyone to be able to look at it and see something that is meaningful to them on the cake,” said Carmen Neville, SAIT’s events and communications generalist for the centennial project.

Just how did such a big cake move from the kitchen in the John Ware building to the celebration point in the Stan Grad building?

“It has to be moved in pieces and finished building when it gets there,” said Neville.

From conception to completion, the project reflected SAIT’s community.

Chef Warden expressed “a huge thank you to everyone for the volunteerism. Their effort is what made this happen.

“We really want to emphasize that this is a group effort. It is not a project that was just meant for one person to do. It was meant for many people to get together.”

This process was a once in a lifetime opportunity for everyone involved. The school could only turn 100 once, but the collaboration that took place lives on every day at SAIT.

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